Transferring Ownership of Writing to Students

The post that appears below is the original, unedited draft I submitted to Edutopia, an amazing website of all things education! (To all my readers working in schools, it is highly valuable and worth following.)

Their Own Writes: Transferring Ownership to Students

Control a student’s writing, and you have a good paper. 

Transfer ownership to a student, and you have a good writer. 

Thought not exactly about fish anymore, this adage is something I am constantly striving for in my high school English classroom. The more I can set up conditions that allow students to be in control of their writing, the better. In this way, they will not just score well in my class; more importantly, they will foster the skills necessary across curriculum and throughout their lifetime to be effective communicators. Here are some steps I’ve applied over the years to transfer writing ownership to students.

Open the Gate.

One of the biggest pitfalls I see in my teaching is when students become reliant on me to be the gatekeeper of good writing. Some surefire signs that this is happening: they rely on weasel words such as “good” and “bad” that don’t really describe anything helpful; they don’t know how to use a rubric; I hear these questions: “Miss, is this good?” or “Miss, can you read this?”

I have found using models regularly in the classroom to be the best way to cede my role as gatekeeper. We can write collaboratively as a whole class to feel good writing form. I write models for students, either in front of them or often beforehand, and then we deconstruct it together, usually with color coding and annotations. Something I did this year that worked well was a station activity with student examples. Students previously wrote a paragraph and I selected some based on relevant skills. Then in groups, they traveled to each of the stations, discussing strengths and comparisons to their own paragraphs, and finally they independently reflected on a graphic organizer. However, the single most important strategy to stepping down as gatekeeper is the collaborative scoring of student samples. For this process, I pair students up with a rubric. They have to read samples, then come to a consensus for each criteria. After this process is complete, we moderate as a whole class. 

Provide a Mirror.

Once students become the gatekeepers, a critical next step is metacognition.

I build in lots of opportunities for students to reflect on their writing throughout the entire process. Recently, students were assigned to show up to class with half a draft. Their first task in class was a reflection form. I then used that to guide writing conferences, only zeroing in on their self-identified areas of feedback. Often, after writing mini-lessons and/or workshopping, I ask students to email me a plan as an exit slip outlining what they noticed in their writing and what are their specific next steps. 

Pass the Gavel.

Now that students know what constitutes good writing, reflect on it in relationship to themselves, it is time for evaluation. Any humanities teacher will gladly tell you about the time-intensive work of grading papers. But…if we can transfer ownership to the students, evaluation can be independent, thus ongoing and formative!

Very rarely do I have students submit an essay without self-scoring. If it is the final, I have them do it directly on the rubric. One of my favorite pieces of feedback to give is “I 100% agree with your self-reflection!” This puts the student in the driver’s seat of his/her own learning. If it is a draft, I like Google forms for this task. I also almost always build in time during class for peer feedback and evaluation of a completed draft. My favorite way to do this is with a graphic organizer broken down by rubric criterion (like this one [without scoring] or this one [with scoring]). The first task is for students to write down what area they are worried about and seeking feedback in (sometimes this is embedded on the graphic organizer; sometimes I have them write it on a post-it). Then students pass the graphic organizer along with printed essay for peer feedback and/or scoring rounds. 

Please Apply.

All of this sets up the premise that students can be in charge of their writing. However, what really matters is the space to apply the feedback. So often–just as it is in teaching–there is so much data without meaningful time to address it. Building in time for application is the final step in transferring ownership to students. 

I like to do this throughout the writing process with small chunks. For example, I often have students write, evaluate, rewrite and reflect on their thesis or topic sentences, or analysis, using a Google form. I also find giving whole class feedback on patterns and then having students revise one in their writing works well. Sometimes I anonymously take one student’s paper and we rework it as a whole class. Then, students need to rework their own piece applying what they just learned.  

I recognize all of this requires more time. But, ultimately, depth over breadth is another way we transfer writing ownership to students. 

Do you have resources or strategies to help students own their writing? I’d love to hear about them!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Tried and True Teaching Tools

writing into meaning

Reflections

An archive of reflective pieces included in school memos and publications.

gadflyonthewallblog

"To sting people and whip them into a fury, all in the service of truth."

Escaping Bars

Writings on Love, Pain, Overcoming, Hope, Longing, Justice, and Injustice

juliaetorres.blog

Strength \ Vision \ Service \ Exploration

A Tree On Fire With Love

But it's still scary sometimes because most people think love only looks like one thing, instead of the whole world

teaching With "Ang-sigh-eh-tea"

The life of a teacher who struggles with anxiety and depression.

Sampa Sympatico

A Yankee Teacher's Experience of Sao Paulo, Brazil

LINDSAY JILL

The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step

Once Upon a Time in México

Living my dream of teaching, traveling, and discovering culture

Teach. Travel. Taste.

A peek into the life of an American teacher in Colombia

2seetheglobe

Adventures in Globetrotting

Nomad Notions

Tales of Expat Living, Teaching, and Tramping in Taiwan and Beyond.

Sojourners' Journal

“Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people." —Albert Einstein

Middle East by Midwest

Observations and Experiences of Bahrain

Ex(pat) and the City

The life of a twenty-something Canadian living & teaching in Korea.

ISR Discussion Boards

ISR Discussion Boards are open to site members and visitors alike. Your Voice Counts.

Teaching & Traveling

The Life of An International Teacher

EAT~PRAY~TRAVEL

THE ADVENTURES OF A NOMADIC EDUCATOR

pedagogyofthereformed

Teaching in Brooklyn in Spite of Everything

Actively Dying

by Peter Fall Ranger

Practicing Presence

An attempt at mindfulness in life, learning, and love

chanyado

by Aleya Kassam

Words Half Heard

writing into meaning

Greatfull

A snapshot of my journey to living each day with gratitude and striving to be full of greatness

tspelczech

"I'm too old to live my life in fear of dumb people." - Charlie Skinner, The Newsroom

Cultivate Clarity

creative writing and mindfulness-based coaching, workshops, and retreats

Crawling Out of the Classroom

In everything that my students and I do together, we strive to find ways to use reading and writing to make the world outside of our classroom a better place for all of us to be

ADVENTURES ON THE YOGA MAT

writing into meaning

affectiveliving.wordpress.com/

Purpose, Perspective, and Perseverance for thriving in a challenging world

candidkay

Taking the journey, bumps and all

jenny's lark

the beauty of an ordinary life

Nonlinear Compilations

Parenting, teaching, writing, and learning to find beauty in the present

talk from chalk

What I've learned while teaching

Thoughtful teaching

Thoughts on teaching in the modern world.

Hope, Honor, and Happiness

A blog for the book “Kingdom of the Sun” and discussions on finding the Hope, Honor, and Happiness in education, life, and the seemingly impossible.

Secret Teacher

Life inside the primary classroom

A Confederacy of Spinsters

Sex, Dating, and Surviving Your Twenties

Miss Four Eyes

Seeing twice as much absolutely counts as a super power.

SCC ENGLISH

writing into meaning

%d bloggers like this: